Owen Beeler...grt.grt.grandson.to Owen b cecil

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Owen Beeler...grt.grt.grandson.to Owen b cecil [Visitor]
I really enjoyed this article...i am tracking my heritage.overton young .brother in law to Owen benetic cecil.death 1860 sandy point tx.trying to find out how died. which brozoria cty.library should I start with ??? Thank You
 Permalink 07/09/17 @ 21:25
Ronald Howard Livingston

In response to: Christopher Greenup Cox: A Pioneer Texas Physician

Ronald Howard Livingston [Visitor]
According to the entry for the Cox family in Stephen F. Austin's Register of Families, Christopher G. Cox, age 27, a doctor by profession, brought his wife Harriet H., age 24, their son, and one other dependent (possibly a slave), from Tennessee to Texas, arriving in February 1830. The family constituted Register entry 269. Entry 268 in the Register was the family of Joseph Rees. Joseph, age 46, a farmer from Tennessee, was accompanied by his wife, Margaret, four sons, two daughters, and nine other dependents. The Rees family also arrived in February 1830, and like Christopher G. Cox, Joseph Rees took the oath of allegiance on March 15, 1830 (the coincidental dates indicate the two families likely traveled together). Brazoria County deed records (Book D Volume 2 Pages 291-293) indicate that Christopher Randolph Cox at the time of the June 29, 1840, partition of the estate of Christopher G. Cox was "the only surviving child of the said Harriett [H. Erwin] and the said Christopher G. Cox, deceased." The same record notes the death of Harriett Caroline Cox since the death of her father, Christopher G. Cox. Among property awarded to Christopher Randolph Cox in the partition of the estate is Labor Number 14 in Brazoria County, which Christopher G. Cox had purchased from Francis and Martha Wells and was conveyed by them to the heirs on 9 November 1839.
 Permalink 05/31/17 @ 07:30
Becky

In response to: To Be Demolished

Becky [Visitor]
I hate Dow with a passion.
 Permalink 05/30/17 @ 21:56
Jan Lawson

In response to: Christopher Greenup Cox: A Pioneer Texas Physician

Jan Lawson [Visitor]
When land was transferred in 1839 to the Cox heirs, was Peyton R. Cox included? Also, do you know if Peyton R. Cox was included as an heir in the settlement of the estate of Joseph and Margaret (Bowman) Reese (1845/1850)? The only children of Harriet Hite (Reese) Cox/Erwin I've seen mentioned were Christopher R. Cox, Thomas R. Erwin and Harriet Erwin. Peyton R. Cox was cited as an heir in 1842 Equity case in Warren Co., KY. regarding the Estate of his grandfather Phineas Cox (Christopher Randolph Cox was not included). I found a guardianship bond in Warren Co., KY. for Peyton R. Cox by his uncle, James Frederick Cox, dated 4/25/1845. Peyton was also included, as as heir of Phineas Cox, in deed for sale of 3 tracts of land in Warren Co., KY. dated 9/13/1845. Makes me wonder if Peyton was a son of Harriet Hite (Reese) Cox/Erwin why he apparently remained in Warren Co., KY.???????
 Permalink 05/30/17 @ 03:13
Adam E. Young

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Adam E. Young [Visitor]
Interesting, he is my great great grandfather as well!
 Permalink 03/28/16 @ 06:25
Robert Bullock

In response to: U. S. Military Personnel from Brazoria County, Texas, Who Were Casualties in the Vietnamese War

Robert Bullock [Visitor]
Dear Mr. Livingston, Thank you for all your work on Brazoria County and the Austin-Bryan-Perry family. I am a member of that family and would very much like to be in touch with you about the Gulf Prairie Cemetery. Would you please send me your email? Thanks, Robert H. Bullock Jr.
 Permalink 12/24/15 @ 14:01
Robert Harlan

In response to: To Be Demolished

Robert Harlan [Visitor]
There were a total of 5 Houses. Behind the garage apartment there was a house. About 50 yards in front of that was a small feed shed and chicken coop. And across the slave ditch there was a very old house. There was also a wooden bridge for access to the main house. There was a small shed and a water cistern on the east side of the garage apartment about 8ft up on a platform. Behind that was a Dipping vat for the Cattle. There was a very large barn to east of the working pens that had a storage room in the middle of it.
 Permalink 12/14/15 @ 20:46
Kimberly

In response to: Doctor Thomas Rivers Erwin, Early Texas Physician

Kimberly [Visitor]
I like the way you ended this article; big difference between the South American continent and a community called "South America."
 Permalink 06/18/15 @ 03:16
Ronald Howard Livingston

In response to: Christopher Greenup Cox: A Pioneer Texas Physician

admin [Member]
Hi, Kimberly, Thank you for the question. For quick clarification, the Old Three-Hundred is a reference to the first colonization contract (initially made to Austin's father, Moses Austin) and the 297 grantees who received lands under terms of that contract. (As a result of your question, I have applied a link to the text of the blog for more detail.) Generally, Austin's Register of Families lists names of colonists who were applying for grants under some of Austin's subsequent contracts.
 Permalink 03/11/15 @ 02:06
Kimberly

In response to: Christopher Greenup Cox: A Pioneer Texas Physician

Kimberly [Visitor]
I am not familiar with the "Old Three-Hundred" term; could you elaborate a bit on that part?
 Permalink 03/10/15 @ 23:43
Augie Doggy

In response to: Gulf Prairie Cemetery: A Brief History

Augie Doggy [Visitor]
Seems a shame to move Stephen Austin after spending twenty good dollars shipping him to Gulf Prairie Cemetery.
 Permalink 06/02/14 @ 11:28
Marcus A. Weems, Jr.

In response to: The Tyler-Bryan-Weems House

Marcus A. Weems, Jr. [Visitor]
This was my paternal grandparents' home. In addition to spending every Christmas there with the ENTIRE family for years, we visited almost daily as my father stopped by while we were on our way to school, to give my grandmother her diabetes shot. The house is beautiful. You have done a wonderful job. The balcony used to be screened in. That "sleeping porch" is where they would wrangle us together for nap time. Many fond memories. Thanks for taking such good care of it.
 Permalink 08/18/13 @ 20:24
Joanne Young

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Joanne Young [Visitor]
wow amazing he is my great great grandfather. Thanks for the history.
 Permalink 08/18/13 @ 17:23
Ron Strybos

In response to: To Be Demolished

Ron Strybos [Visitor]
Good job on the write up Ron Livingston. When I worked at Stratton Ridge I was always saddened when Dow ordered the destruction of the old buildings; first the old barns, and now the old houses. A little bit of additional info, other slave cabins were still partially standing to the north of the house on the far side of the slave ditch as late as 2004. The overseer's house stood on the south side of the road and little to the east of the house. We found the foundations when we set a utility pole back in 2006. The well in the front of the house was once surrounded by ox blood lillies of which I now have some. Too bad about the old buildings; they where well built. They have withstood many hurricanes.
 Permalink 05/01/13 @ 18:38
Theresa

In response to: To Be Demolished

Theresa [Visitor]
These things sadden me. Sometimes our historic buildings seem to be taken for granted. TO bad more time/effort couldn't have gone into saving them. Photo documentation prior to demolition was hopefully done. Regards, Theresa (Tangled Trees)
 Permalink 02/15/13 @ 11:11
GRANT DAVIS

In response to: To Be Demolished

GRANT DAVIS [Visitor]
Welcome to Geneabloggers! Regards, Grant
 Permalink 02/09/13 @ 12:18
Sherry Shaw

In response to: The Tyler-Bryan-Weems House

Sherry Shaw [Visitor]
Was excited to find and read your blog on the old Weems home. This was my childhood home. Charles (Pete) and JoAnn Meador lived in this home and raised five children from 1965 until 1978...so the home had been lived in and filled with love in the years prior to the Johnson's restoration....many, many happy memories here! Thank you for sharing your research!
 Permalink 01/14/13 @ 22:09
Phil

In response to: To Be Demolished

Phil [Visitor]
Such a nice structure to be torn down.
 Permalink 11/21/12 @ 08:22
Ronald Howard Livingston

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

admin [Member]
I just want to add the comment here that news writers often mistake Brazoria County as being "Brazos County." The obituary most probably should have stated "Brazoria County," not Brazos County (Bryan and College Station area).
 Permalink 09/16/12 @ 16:41
Kobi Ko

In response to: The Texas Residency of Doctor Amos Pollard

Kobi Ko [Visitor]
As a non-historian, I cannot say whether I agree with your conclusions or not, but you do make a compelling argument. It's a little difficult for someone my age to read the smaller, indented text against the speckled background, though :) By the way, I once taught a computer class to adults who may or may not have been able to do the algebraic calculation in your antispam test.
 Permalink 08/06/12 @ 01:31
Augie Doggy

In response to: The Texas Residency of Doctor Amos Pollard

Augie Doggy [Visitor]
Nicely reasoned and documented.
 Permalink 08/05/12 @ 14:04
Kimmy

In response to: The Texas Residency of Doctor Amos Pollard

kimberly [Member]
Very well done. I think the case you present is very sound and I would agree with your conclusion.
 Permalink 08/05/12 @ 13:29
Cassandra Martindale

In response to: The Tyler-Bryan-Weems House

Cassandra Martindale [Visitor]
I guess I was surprised that while speaking of the Terry Family you did not mention that these were the Terrys of the Terry's Texas Rangers. My son did a Texas History project last year on Terry's Rangers. We also visited the Sandy Point Cemetery. It was very interesting, lots of old graves there.
 Permalink 07/27/12 @ 10:58
James Kent Bracken

In response to: The Tyler-Bryan-Weems House

James Kent Bracken [Visitor]
Mary Louis (Chilton) Bryan is the grandmother of my mothers first cousin, Briscoe Bryan of Galveston Texas. Briscoe's mother, Marjorie Allen of Port Gibson, Mississippi married Chilton Bryan of Houston, who was the son of Mary Louis Bryan and Austin Bryan. Marjorie had two children, Chilton Bryan of Houston (deceased), and Briscoe Bryan, still living in Galveston.
 Permalink 06/10/12 @ 01:29
Lynna Kay Shuffield

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Lynna Kay Shuffield [Visitor]
Galveston Weekly News (Galveston, Galveston Co., TX), Mon., 24 Sep 1877, p. 8, c. 4 == Another Veteran Gone == The remains of Col. Overton Young, of Brazos county, were buried with military honors by the military organization of this city, Tuesday, 18th inst. Col. Young was 54 years of age, native of Georgia, a lawyer by profession, and for 26 years was an honored citizen of this State. During the late war, he commanded the 8th Texas regiment, and received a painful wound in the battle of Mansfield. His death was caused by an absess of the brain. He was in this city for the purpose of being treated for his malady when the "king of terrors overtook him."
 Permalink 04/28/11 @ 13:38
Bruce Allardice

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Bruce Allardice [Visitor]
Col. Young is buried in Galveston's Catholic Cemetery, in an unmarked grave. See "Texas Burial Sites of Civil War Notables," a book I co-authored.
 Permalink 04/22/11 @ 17:01
WMS

In response to: William C. Gill, Sr.

WMS [Visitor]
I love reading articles online actually, I have my own small archive in my pc listing all history or biography. articles online are very important because it consists of information that are very relevant to our society from the archives that are used in school to the articles who relays their lives and use as a person biography.
 Permalink 01/22/11 @ 02:20
Modern Carnival Cruises

In response to: The Steamboat Yellow Stone: The Lil' Steamer That Could

I write some topics about modern cruises. But you give a total new idea how to write a post. Maybe I must restart again and write a post like you in this blog. I totally want my blog about modern cruises as well as you write here.
 Permalink 10/27/10 @ 11:34
Muhammad Ahmad Raza

In response to: The Steamboat Yellow Stone: The Lil' Steamer That Could

This is a fantastic blog you have here. I visit here every week. I have already subscribed to your rss feed to help me stay update with your publication. Are you on twitter so that I can follow you?
 Permalink 09/23/10 @ 03:07
Ronald W. Crockett

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Ronald W. Crockett [Visitor]
Overton Young and Ann Compton Young had a daughter Ina also. She was born in Dec. 1865. She married William Rufus Nash and their ranch is north of West Columbia. Their daughter Kitty Nash married Browning Groce. Kitty Nash Groce left her large ranch to her cousins for their life and it has now reverted to the Espiscopal Church at West Columbia and also a Medical facility in West Columbia. Their daughter Dora married Frank Brown Weeks. William and Ina built a beautiful large city house at 217 (now 215 Westmoreland in Houston. For a number of years, Dora and Frank Weeks also lived with them until they built their house 3410 Burlington in the same Westmoreland Additon. William Rufus Nash was the son of a Brazoria County merchant, Edward Nash, and his wife Catherine Cooke. Edward Nash died in October 1860 in Brooklyn New York soon after the birth of William R. in April of 1860. On May 6, 1872 Catherine Cooke Nash, married her brother-in-law John Adriance, who was a very successful merchant, planter, and state representative in Brazoria County. His wife, Lydia Ann Cooke, who was Catherine's sister had died in 1871. William Nash was 12 years old when he mother remarried. In the 1880 census Ina and Dora were in Beaumont with their half sister Lelia Manadue, Valade. They were 13 and 10 and going to school in Beaumont. Dora married Sydney Albert Long, a very successful lumber man as her first husband. He died about 1900 and she married Frank Brown Weeks about 1901
 Permalink 08/30/10 @ 00:08
mbt sale

In response to: The Steamboat Yellow Stone: The Lil' Steamer That Could

mbt sale [Visitor]
Wow! I?ve never heard of this before and I think they?re awesome!
 Permalink 08/04/10 @ 02:57
desert

In response to: William C. Gill, Sr.

desert [Visitor]
i like your web pages
 Permalink 08/02/10 @ 02:31
Richard Tinsley

In response to: The Steamboat Yellow Stone: The Lil' Steamer That Could

Richard Tinsley [Visitor]
I have often read about the steamboat but never in such detail. This is wonderful news to me! Many thanks !
 Permalink 08/01/10 @ 23:30
Ginger Tumlinson

In response to: The Steamboat Yellow Stone: The Lil' Steamer That Could

Ginger Tumlinson [Visitor]
Your site is fantastic! Good Job!!
 Permalink 08/01/10 @ 21:52
roof repair

In response to: Benjamin Franklin Holt

roof repair [Visitor]
Very good post.
 Permalink 07/26/10 @ 12:25
dolores monet

In response to: Benjamin Franklin Holt

dolores monet [Visitor]
What a wonderful site. Not only is the site itself attractive, but you are doing a wonderful service in helping to preserve history!
 Permalink 05/27/10 @ 08:12
Kimberly

In response to: Overton Young: A Son of the Old South

Kimberly [Visitor]
Given the prominence of the man, why do you suppose the burial site is unknown and has not been found? What was the standard practice of the time concerning burials? Why was his wife not buried beside him; was that not the practice at the time?
 Permalink 12/28/09 @ 12:08